Sink

Sculpture, 516 Arts, ISEA 2012, Albuquerque, New Mexico, 19.09.12 — 06.01.13

‘Sink’ is a model of anthropogenic ocean acidification. Fuel is burnt by an internal combustion engine to turn a propeller. The carbon dioxide rich exhaust gasses are piped into a tank containing brine and a scallop shell. The dissolved carbon dioxide creates carbonic acid and increases the acidity of the brine. The calcium carbonate in the shell slowly begins to dissolve.

During the Paleocene-Eocene Thermal Maximum 55 Million years ago, rapidly rising C02 levels, resulting from the combustion of methane, coincided with a planetary break in shell production that lasted for 100,000 years.

Sink was shown as part of the Wai group of exhibits in the Machine Wilderness exhibition at ISEA 2012 in Albuquerque, New Mexico

Wai

Machine Wilderness, 516 Arts, ISEA 2012

Sink was shown as an large print at Un Litro De Agua, Casa Tres Patios, Medellin, Colombia June 2012

Un Litro De Agua

Casa Tres Patios

Credits

Don Hunter
Ana Terry
Ian Clothier
Intercreate